Laying to rest the myth that the 15th July 2016 was a “controlled coup”

Sedat Ergin has been conducting a forensic study of the various indictments and the administrative coming and goings in Turkey since the 15th July attempted coup, with regular contributions on the subject in Hürriyet Daily News. Now an interview with Ergin summarises his findings. In part of the interview he says:

There are a number of questions lingering that need to be clarified. Chief of General Staff Akar and National Intelligence Agency (MİT) chief Hakan Fidan did not conduct a proper crisis management once they received word of the coup attempt. They should have taken a different course of action. So there was operational failure on their part and it was wrong to keep the civil authority uninformed.

Another issue is the fact that Fidan, after assessing the intelligence with Akar, called the president but could not reach him. He then asked the president’s security chief whether they could protect themselves.

This shows that he was concerned about something that could affect the security of the president, and it also needs clarification. But such question marks should not lead us to the conclusion that this was a controlled coup. The huge volume of evidence in the indictments shows us that this was indeed a very serious coup attempt, not the kind you would face in a “controlled coup” environment. Read full article here

A separate question is raised as to the severity of the Turkish government emergency measures that remain in force until today. Such measures necessarily have a “authoritarian” character to them. But what if there is credible evidence that the foreign intelligence services of two major powers were behind the coup attempt, putting the very sovereignty of the Turkish at stake? What then? To paraphrase the German BILD propaganda during the last Turkish referendum on the constitution: What would Atatürk have done?